Facts: The Wolf Eel

Facts: The Wolf Eel


The wolf eel is not a true eel. It is a species of wolf fish that lives in
the North Pacific Ocean. Wolf eels are bottom dwelling fish that can
inhabit rocky shorelines down to 740 ft (226 m) deep. They prefer enclosed spaces, like rocky crevices. They sometimes have to compete with octopuses
for a desirable living space. Despite their fearsome appearance, wolf eels
are actually quite docile. They are capable of becoming friendly with
divers and even eating food out of their hands. Each adult wolf eel has a unique pattern of
dark spots on their head. Wolf eel pairs are believed to mate for life. The pair will occupy the same den. They begin pairing up at around 4 years of
age and begin to reproduce at around 7 years of age. The female will lay an egg mass in the den. The mass is guarded by both the male and female. They will even wrap their bodies around the
egg mass. At this time, only one parent at a time will
go out to feed. The egg mass may contain 10,000 eggs that
will take about 16 weeks to hatch. The hatched larvae are pelagic. They will live in the water column for up
to 2 years and feed on zooplankton before settling closer to the seafloor. Juveniles are more vibrantly colored than
adults. Their bright colors fade to shades of gray
and brown as they grow. Adults can grow near 8 ft (240 cm) long. Adult wolf eels typically feed on invertebrates
like crabs, snails, and sea urchins. They stick their head out of their den to
watch for prey. They crush their prey with their strong canine
and molar teeth. Populations of wolf eels are believed to be
stable. Adults are preyed on by harbor seals and large
fish. For more marine facts, click the SUBSCRIBE
button!!

One thought on “Facts: The Wolf Eel

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *